Key West Chamber Events

BG094-PO

An original interpretation of the Queen of Clubs playing card is seen here as the central image on this “Poster From The Past”. When creating the original artwork for this poster, only one half was drawn and just duplicated for the other half when printed. Halfway In the middle between the Queen facing up and the Queen facing down is the lettering for the concert bill. Each Queen is holding a flower in her hand. This is BG Fillmore poster number #94 in the old series and was the second and last piece that the artist Nicholqas Kouninos ever did for Bill Graham. That is indeed unfortunate as his work showed considerable promise and potential. It was printed only one time.

47 years ago back in 1967, that Donovan, H. P. Lovecraft and Mother Earth, played for three nights of Dance/Concerts. On the first night (the 24th) it was at The Fillmore Auditorium and the following two nights took place at the Winterland Arena, here in San Francisco. The incredible light show provided by Glenn McKay’s Head Lights.

Share some “Lady Luck” with a friend!
Wonderful show and poster Approved by Professor Poster


MI0001333858Donovan

Artist Biography by Jason Ankeny

Upon his emergence during the mid-’60s, Donovan was anointed “Britain’s answer to Bob Dylan,” a facile but largely unfounded comparison which compromised the Scottish folk-pop troubadour’s own unique vision. Where the thrust of Dylan‘s music remains its bleak introspection and bitter realism,Donovan fully embraced the wide-eyed optimism of the flower power movement, his ethereal, ornate songs radiating a mystical beauty and childlike wonder; for better or worse, his recordings remain quintessential artifacts of the psychedelic era, capturing the peace and love idealism of their time to perfection. Donovan Leitch was born May 10, 1946 in Glasgow and raised outside of London; at 18 he recorded his first demo, and in 1965 was tapped as a regular on the television pop showcase Ready, Steady, Go! He soon issued his debut single “Catch the Wind,” earning the first round of Dylan comparisons with his ramshackle folk sound and ragamuffin look; the single nevertheless reached the U.K. Top Five, with a subsequent meeting between the two singer/songwriters captured in the classic D.A. Pennebaker documentary Don’t Look Back.

Donovan‘s follow-up single, “Colours,” was also a hit, and after making his American debut at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival, he issued Fairytale, his second and last LP for the Hickory label. Signing with Epic in 1966, he released his breakthrough album, Sunshine Superman, which in its exotic arrangements and pointedly psychedelic lyrical outlook heralded a major shift from his previous work; the title track topped the charts on both sides of the Atlantic, with the enigmatic “Mellow Yellow” reaching the number two spot a few months later. Donovan remained a chart fixture throughout 1967, generating a series of hits including “Epistle to Dippy,” “There Is a Mountain,” and “Wear Your Love Like Heaven”; that year he traveled to India alongside the Beatles to study with the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, a journey which inspired him to renounce drug use and encourage his listeners to turn to meditation. The ambitious double album A Gift from a Flower to a Garden followed, and in 1968 Donovan resurfaced with The Hurdy Gurdy Man, scoring a Top Five smash with the hallucinatory title cut; the record also yielded the hit “Jennifer Juniper.”

MI0001402731Barabajagal from 1969 generated Donovan‘s final Top 40 hit, “Atlantis”; for the title track, he collaborated with the Jeff Beck Group, with whom he also worked on 1970s Open Road. He then retreated to Ireland, emerging from a period of seclusion by starring in and scoring the 1972 film The Pied Piper; a pair of new LPs, Cosmic Wheels and Essence to Essence, appeared the following year to disappointing reviews and little commercial interest. Following 1974’s 7-Tease, he spent the next years living quietly in California’s Joshua Tree desert, mounting only a small club tour to promote 1976’s Slow Down; a self-titled LP appeared a year later, and in the wake of 1983’s Jerry Wexler-produced Lady of the Stars, he essentially retired from writing and recording altogether. The Donovan revival began in earnest in 1991 when Happy Mondaystitled a song in his honor for their groundbreaking Pills ‘n’ Thrills & Bellyaches; he later toured with the group as well. Five years later, Donovan released his comeback LP, Sutras, helmed by producer du jour Rick Rubin. (The album had the misfortune to be released after Rubin‘s landmark Johnny Cashrecord, American Recordings and was virtually ignored or misunderstood by critics.) Donovan toured briefly to support Sutras and then went missing once again, playing out only sporadically. In 2004, however, he reappeared with the intimate and stylish Beat Cafe, a collection of nearly all-original songs produced by keyboardist John ChelewDonovan also enlisted bassist Danny Thompson and drummer Jim Keltner to round out his quartet. The album featured a pair of covers, a spoken word rendition of poet Dylan Thomas‘ “Do Not Go Gentle,” and a startling rendition of the traditional tune “The Cuckoo.”


582651a839330dc5541031d171c240e4Mother Earth

Biography by Greg Prato

The late-’60s/early-’70s blues-rock outfit Mother Earth was led by singer Tracy Nelson and issued several somewhat underappreciated releases during their time span. Nelson was originally from Madison, WI, and it was while attending the University of Wisconsin that the singer was discovered by producer Sam Charters and was eventually signed to a recording contract with the Prestige label. 1965 saw the release of Nelson‘s solo debut, the folk-based Deep Are the Roots, and when it didn’t exactly burn up the charts, Nelson decided to relocate to San Francisco, with the hopes of forming a more conventional rock outfit. Shortly after arriving on the West Coast, Mother Earth was formed, which led to performances at the famed Fillmore West, opening for the likes of Janis JoplinJimi Hendrix, and Eric Burdon. After an appearance on the soundtrack to the 1968 motion picture Revolution (which also featured the Quicksilver Messenger Service and the Steve Miller Band), Mother Earth signed with Mercury Records and issued a steady stream of releases until the early ’70s.

MI0002004863These albums included 1968’s Living with the Animals1969’s Tracy Nelson Country and Make a Joyful Noise, 1970’s Satisfied, 1971’s Bring Me Home, 1972’s Tracy Nelson/Mother Earth, and 1973’s Poor Man’s Paradise, before Nelson pursued a solo career. Subsequently, Nelson earned a Grammy nomination in 1974 for the track “After the Fire Is Gone” (a duet with Willie Nelson) and continued to issue solo albums until the early ’80s, when she became disillusioned with the direction that popular music was going in (although she did sing backup for Neil Young for a spell in the mid-’80s, including appearing with Young at the mammoth Live Aid concert in 1985). Nelson returned to music in the ’90s, beginning with 1993’s In the Here and Now, continuing to issue solo recordings (and in 1998, earned another Grammy nomination for the release Sing It!, a collaboration with Marcia Ball and Irma Thomas).


lovecraft-p_r-pixH.P. Lovecraft

Biography by Richie Unterberger

Featuring two strong singers (who often sang dual leads), hauntingly hazy arrangements, and imaginative songwriting that drew from pop and folk influences, H.P. Lovecraft was one of the better psychedelic groups of the late ’60s. The band was formed by ex-folky George Edwards in Chicago in 1967. Edwards and keyboardist Dave Michaels, a classically trained singer with a four-octave range, handled the vocals, which h_-p_-lovercraft-bandechoed Jefferson Airplane‘s in their depth and blend of high and low parts. Their self-titled 1967 LP was an impressive debut, featuring strong originals and covers of early compositions by Randy Newman and Fred Neil, as well as one of the first underground FM radio favorites, “White Ship.” The band moved to California the following year; their second and last album, H.P. Lovecraft II, was a much more sprawling and unfocused work, despite some strong moments. A spin-off group, Lovecraft, released a couple LPs in the ’70s that bore little relation to the first incarnation of the band.